Dance News Feedhttp://dance.wisc.edu/This is the News RSS Feed for the Dance Department in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.urn:uuid:79dec237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/20/tone-madison-highlights--bury-the-hatchet--project-from-uw-madison-s-hitchcock Tone Madison highlights ‘Bury the Hatchet’ project from UW–Madison's HitchcockThe work of UW-Madison’s John Hitchcock was featured in Tone Madison’s look back at top musical offerings during 2019. The Tone Madison report explains: “Artist John Hitchcock's ‘Bury The Hatchet’ project (currently on display at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art's Wisconsin Triennial, complete with a vinyl listening station), combines printmaking, oral history, and music to explore the clash of Indigenous people and white conquest in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma." Hitchcock, is a professor with the Art Department and is the School of Education's associate dean for the arts.Fri, 20 Dec 2019 11:29:00 Z<p>The work of UW-Madison&rsquo;s John Hitchcock was featured in Tone Madison&rsquo;s look back at top musical offerings during 2019.</p> <p>The Tone Madison report explains: &ldquo;Artist John Hitchcock's &lsquo;Bury The Hatchet&rsquo; project (currently on display at the Madison Museum of Contemporary Art's <a href="https://www.mmoca.org/art/2019-wisconsin-triennial" target="_blank">Wisconsin Triennial</a>, complete with a vinyl listening station), combines printmaking, oral history, and music to explore the clash of Indigenous people and white conquest in the Wichita Mountains of Oklahoma. (Hitchcock himself is of Comanche, Kiowa, and European descent, and has family ties to that area.) Playing electric, lap steel, and pedal steel guitars, Hitchcock both evokes and challenges our romantic notions about the Great Plains with expansive, arid compositions.&rdquo;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/bury-the-hatchet.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Bury the Hatchet" title="Bury the Hatchet" class="FloatImageRight" />The report from Scott Gordon adds: &ldquo;Layered throughout are additional strings, wind instruments, percussion, and keyboard from a large cast of Madison musicians, and audio recordings of Comanche and Kiowa songs, prayers, and interviews. One high point, &lsquo;Jimmy Creek (A Comanche Story),&rsquo; weaves together Hannah Edl&eacute;n's clarinet with multiple tracks of guitar to accompany a reel-to-reel recording of Hitchcock&rsquo;s grandfather, Saukwaukee John Dussome Reid. This album is one component of a larger project, but it's immersive all on its own, placing the listener in a space that's at once dreamlike and solidly connected to real places and events.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hitchcock, is a professor with the&nbsp;<a href="http://art.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" title="Art Dept. home page">Art Department</a>&nbsp;and is the School of Education's associate dean for the arts.</p> <p>Check out the entire report via this <a href="https://www.tonemadison.com/articles/more-madison-records-we-loved-in-2019" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">Tone Madison web page</a>.</p> <p>This write-up was a follow-up to Tone Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.tonemadison.com/articles/tone-madisons-top-20-madison-records-of-2019" target="_blank">top 20 Madison records 0f 2019 list</a>.</p>urn:uuid:efd9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/18/npr-interviews-uw-madison-s-barry-about--genius-grant--recognition NPR interviews UW-Madison’s Barry about 'Genius Grant' recognitionNational Public Radio (NPR) recently interviewed UW-Madison’s Lynda Barry, one of this year’s recipients of the MacArthur Foundation's "Genius Grants." Barry is a professor of interdisciplinary creativity with the School of Education’s Art Department and holds the Chazen Family Distinguished Chair in Art. The artist spoke to NPR about genius, which she doesn’t believe is necessary to create comics or art. Wed, 18 Dec 2019 11:38:00 Z<p>National Public Radio (NPR) recently interviewed UW-Madison&rsquo;s Lynda Barry, one of this year&rsquo;s recipients of the MacArthur Foundation's "Genius Grants."</p> <p>Barry is a professor of interdisciplinary creativity with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" title="Art dept. website" target="_blank">Art Department</a> and holds the Chazen Family Distinguished Chair in Art. She joined the faculty in 2013 after serving as the spring 2012 artist in residence at the Arts Institute, and is recognized for her unique style and approachable books and comics.</p> <p>Her graphic novel&nbsp;&ldquo;What It Is&rdquo;&nbsp;won the 2009 Eisner Award for Best Reality Based Graphic Novel. Her other books include&nbsp;&ldquo;Picture This&rdquo;&nbsp;and&nbsp;&ldquo;Syllabus: Notes From an Accidental Professor.&rdquo; Barry&rsquo;s work aims to understand and harness the creative process to help students and researchers advance their work in the arts, humanities, and sciences.<br /> <br /> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/barry_lynda_class13_7543.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Lynda Barry" displaymode="Original" title="Barry_Lynda_class13_7543" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Lynda Barry</figcaption> </figure> </div> The artist spoke to NPR about "genius," which she doesn&rsquo;t believe is necessary to create comics or art. Barry comments on the term: &ldquo;It could mean anything. ... I guess what I mean by that would be that they&rsquo;re able to do stuff in a way that I can&rsquo;t track back to how they were able to do that thing. Sometimes that even applies to 4-year-olds I work with.&rdquo;</p> <p>The specialness of kids&rsquo; drawings appears multiple times in her most recent book, &ldquo;Makings Comics,&rdquo; in which Barry suggests that children&rsquo;s drawing stems from the movement of their hands, not intention. However, she tells NPR, around the age of 5, when a kid enters the school system, they experience a split between drawing and writing that prevents this kind of intention-lacking drawing.&nbsp;</p> <p>Barry explains that some people assume you have to know what you&rsquo;re going to draw before you start drawing. &ldquo;That&rsquo;s one of the things I&rsquo;ve seen when people instruct kids to draw,&rdquo; she tells NPR. &ldquo;They start by telling them how important the paper is. You don&rsquo;t want to waste paper. So, you want to sit and think carefully about what it is you&rsquo;re going to draw before you draw it.&rdquo;</p> <p>In Barry&rsquo;s practice and teaching, though, she aims to help others unlearn these assumptions. She suggests that there is another kind of drawing &mdash; different from representational drawing &mdash; that &ldquo;has to come out of your body.&rdquo; For her, this means following what her hand is doing and moving past the image in her head.&nbsp;</p> Read NPR's complete interview with Barry <a href="https://www.npr.org/2019/11/27/782921983/cartoonist-lynda-barry-drawing-has-to-come-out-of-your-body" title="NR interview" target="_blank">here</a>.urn:uuid:f7d9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/17/isthmus-reviews--flight--from-uw-madison-s-choy Isthmus reviews ‘FLIGHT' from UW-Madison's ChoyThe local Isthmus newspaper reviewed Peggy Choy’s performance, “FLIGHT: Torn Like a Rose.” Choy is an associate professor with the School of Education's Dance Department. Inspired by the 12th century Persian poem “Conference of the Birds,” Choy’s production featured birds on a perilous journey to find love and guidance. Tue, 17 Dec 2019 10:58:00 Z<p>The local Isthmus newspaper recently&nbsp;reviewed Peggy Choy&rsquo;s performance, &ldquo;FLIGHT: Torn Like a Rose.&rdquo;</p> <p>Choy is an associate professor with the School of Education's <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu" title="Dance dept. home page" target="_blank">Dance Department</a>.</p> <p>Inspired by the 12th&nbsp;century Persian poem &ldquo;Conference of the Birds,&rdquo; Choy&rsquo;s production featured birds on a perilous journey to find love and guidance.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/flight.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Flight" title="Flight" class="FloatImageRight" />Isthmus reports on the performances, saying &ldquo;All of the performers were adept at mimicking birds&rsquo; distinct motions, twitchy, fluttering, swooping, preening, pecking, and soaring.&rdquo; The choreography, designed by Choy, combined elements of many styles of dance and martial arts forms. &nbsp;</p> <p>Though Isthmus reporter Kate Reiser describes herself as &ldquo;a &lsquo;less is more&rsquo; kind of audience member,&rdquo; she comments that she particularly enjoyed the &ldquo;stunning&rdquo; theatrical costumes, designed by Andrew Jordan. &ldquo;I felt I was peeking into a magical realm inhabited by mythical creatures,&rdquo; Reiser writes in her review.&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite the theatrical and bustling qualities of the costumes and performance, Reiser picked up on the &ldquo;stillness and self-reflection&rdquo; that the poem and Choy&rsquo;s interpretation ask of its audience.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Read Reiser's full review via <a href="https://isthmus.com/arts/stage/winged-magic/" title="FLIGHT review" target="_blank">this Isthmus web page</a>.</p>urn:uuid:89dac237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/16/uw-madison-school-of-education-recognizes-december-2019-graduates UW-Madison School of Education recognizes December 2019 graduatesUW­–Madison’s School of Education put the spotlight on its latest class of graduates by hosting its annual Pre-Commencement Celebration on Sunday morning, Dec. 15, at the Gordon Dining and Event Center. Prior to heading over to the Kohl Center to walk across the stage at the university’s Winter 2019 Commencement ceremony, students from the School of Education enjoyed breakfast, heard from Associate Dean Julie Mead, and hung out with faculty and staff, family and friends. Bucky Badger even stopped in to check out the event.Mon, 16 Dec 2019 04:20:18 Z<p>UW­&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education put the spotlight on its latest class of graduates by hosting its annual Pre-Commencement Celebration on Sunday morning, Dec. 15, at the Gordon Dining and Event Center.</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/winter2019commencement.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Pre-Commencement Celebration Winter 2019" title="Winter2019Commencement" class="FloatImageRight" />Prior to heading over to the Kohl Center to walk across the stage at the university&rsquo;s Winter 2019 Commencement ceremony, students from the School of Education enjoyed breakfast, heard from Associate Dean Julie Mead, and hung out with faculty and staff, family and friends. Bucky Badger even stopped in to check out the event.</p> <p>In all, about 225 people celebrated Sunday morning as we honored our talented scholars who are earning bachelor&rsquo;s, master&rsquo;s and doctoral degrees in fields across the arts, health, and education.</p> <p>Make sure and check out photo galleries from the event that are posted to the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.facebook.com/UWMadisonEducation">Facebook page</a>.</p> <p>Congratulations and best of luck to all of our December 2019 graduates!</p> <p>Don&rsquo;t forget to stay in touch. And remember, you may no longer be a student &mdash; but you&rsquo;ll always be a Badger! #UWGrad</p>urn:uuid:5fd8c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/13/teacher-speakout---keeps-conversation-going-between-rural-wisconsin-teachers--researchers 'Teacher Speakout!' keeps conversation going between rural Wisconsin teachers, researchersIn November, 19 STEM teachers from 18 rural school districts in Wisconsin attended the third annual "Teacher Speakout!" sponsored by WCER’s Rural Education Research and Implementation Center (RERIC). This exchange of ideas between teachers, researchers, policymakers, and rural advocates offered insight on what is right with rural education.Fri, 13 Dec 2019 11:30:00 Z<p>We hear a lot about the challenges of rural education: declining enrollment, limited resources and funding, difficulty recruiting teachers and keeping them. And at UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://reric.wisc.edu/" title="RERIC website" target="_blank">Rural Education Research &amp; Implementation Center</a> (RERIC), good work is being done to improve educational outcomes in the state&rsquo;s distant, sometimes forgotten classrooms.&nbsp;</p> <p>But on a recent day in November, the narrative shifted when 19 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers from 18 rural districts in Wisconsin traded stories at the third annual "Teacher Speakout!" event sponsored by RERIC, housed at the <a href="http://wcer.wisc.edu" title="WCER website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>&nbsp;(WCER) in UW-Madison&rsquo;s School of Education. This exchange of ideas between teachers, researchers, policymakers, and rural advocates turned into a public display of spirit, grit, and passion for what is right with rural education.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/tso_carousel_pic.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="TSO_carousel_pic" displaymode="Original" title="TSO_carousel_pic" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Justin Gerlach, 2018 Wisconsin Rural Teacher of the Year,<br /> shares his experiences as a STEM teacher in Mishicot. </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;I get to work where everyone else wants to vacation,&rdquo; mused Olivia Dachel, a 19-year high school business, science, and computer science teacher at Merrill High School who considers the unquestionable beauty of the Northwoods a big draw for living and working there.&nbsp;</p> <p>Jessica Dennis teaches math and science on remote Washington Island, the smallest K-12 district in the state with a mere 77 students. The island is accessible only by ferry, but Dennis said, &ldquo;It is one of the most magical places on earth. Disney World has nothing on us!&rdquo;</p> <p>At this year&rsquo;s Teacher Speakout! the focus was on STEM education, identified by RERIC as a research priority. &ldquo;In our conversations with rural school administrators, educators, and parents, we hear about challenges in hiring and retaining STEM teachers, as well as concern over being able to offer STEM courses similar to larger districts,&rdquo; said Craig Albers, RERIC&rsquo;s co-director. &ldquo;We hope participants were able to learn about opportunities at UW-Madison to further strengthen their STEM programs, as the number of STEM-related jobs continues to grow in this country.&rdquo;</p> <p>RERIC co-director Andy Garbacz adds that the research organization has also grounded its work in developing strong partnerships with the rural educational community. &ldquo;We are focused on building collaborations, like we did at Teacher Speakout!, to enhance educational experiences for teachers, families, and students.&rdquo;</p> <h3>Rural Teachers are Resourceful</h3> <p>According to UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://apl.wisc.edu/" title="APL website" target="_blank">Applied Population Lab</a>, enrollment in rural schools has declined 8 percent over 13 years. In a state where funding for public education is partially tied to student enrollment, rural schools &mdash; notorious for small class size &mdash;often get the short end of the funding stick.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/tsofieldtripwalking.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="TSOFieldtripwalking" displaymode="Original" title="TSOFieldtripwalking" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Rural educators at Teacher Speakout! participated in<br /> scientist-led field trips on the UW‒Madison campus.</figcaption> </figure> </div> But for STEM educators at Teacher Speakout!, limited resources and funding have unleashed unlimited creativity inside their classrooms. As WCER Director Bob Mathieu said in his opening remarks, &ldquo;STEM is not about content. It is about inquiry and discovery.&rdquo;</p> <p>Julia Xistris would agree. As the 4K-5 STEM teacher in the School District of Belleville, she says she wants students &ldquo;to become creators of technology, not just consumers.&rdquo; Armed with no curriculum, no budget, and a one-year temporary position, the very resourceful Xistris taught her students &ndash; including kindergarteners &ndash; how to code using a free online international coding program. The little learners intuitively caught on. &ldquo;My class became this amazing computer science coding lab for kids who are passionate about inquiry-based learning.&rdquo;</p> <p>Dennis sees Washington Island as an extension of her classroom. &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t want my students&rsquo; education to be hindered because they live in a remote area. So I incorporate the island&rsquo;s unique surroundings to teach STEM,&rdquo; said Dennis. Last year, her 8<sup>th</sup>&nbsp;graders represented Wisconsin in the Samsung &ldquo;Solve for Tomorrow&rdquo; competition with a project on waste-water disposal. Recently, her students qualified as state finalists for an app they developed on tick prevention. She noted that &ldquo;ticks are a big deal in this area,&rdquo; and that she is proud that their work will benefit the small island community.</p> <h3>It&rsquo;s all about relationships and community</h3> <p>&ldquo;I teach for the relationships.&rdquo; While that quote is attributed to Dachel, she speaks for many rural teachers who value to close bonds they form with their students, families, and communities.</p> <p>&ldquo;When you have the same students from freshman to senior year, it&rsquo;s not about the content anymore; it&rsquo;s about the person,&rdquo; said Jackie Drews, a high school science teacher in the Cambria-Friesland School District. &ldquo;You get a chance to create a sense of community in the classroom and begin educating the individual instead of teaching them the curriculum.&rdquo;</p> <p>Jake Roberts moved back to the Pecatonica area to be near his close-knit family and teaches science at the high school. &ldquo;I like that I have an opportunity to impact every student who graduates since I will have each of them in at least one of my classes,&rdquo; he stated. He is definitely making an impact. Roberts is a two-time recipient of the UW-Platteville Influential Educator Award, nominated by former students he inspired to pursue STEM careers.</p> <p>Beth Allcox is the high school science teacher with the New Holstein District, which she described as &ldquo;in the middle of nowhere and an hour from anywhere.&rdquo; Like Roberts, Allcox knows every student personally by the time they graduate. &ldquo;I am not just a teacher. I am part of their lives.&rdquo;</p> <h3>How researchers and policymakers can help rural educators&nbsp;</h3> <p>Most rural teachers will go the extra mile to help offset funding and staffing shortages, like Justin Gerlach, a Spanish, biology, and agriscience teacher at Mishicot High School who also serves as dean of students and coaches cross country. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s incredibly satisfying to teach in rural Wisconsin because I get to wear multiple hats, be creative, and interact with students on many levels,&rdquo; he stated.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/tsolab.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="TSOLab" displaymode="Original" title="TSOLab" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">STEM teachers from rural Wisconsin learned about stem-<br /> cell-based tissue engineering, industrial hemp and gene-<br /> mapping, to name a few field trip options. </figcaption> </figure> </div> However, &ldquo;going above and beyond is not a sustainable model,&rdquo; said Peter Goff, an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a> whose research has explored supply and demand in rural education labor markets. He asked the group at Teacher Speakout!, &ldquo;what specific state-level policy can help you in rural districts?&rdquo;</p> <p>Xistris weighed in. &ldquo;We need to pull back on standardized testing because it is stifling creativity and inquiry. It is an easy fix that doesn&rsquo;t cost money and can teach to the whole child,&rdquo; she responded.&nbsp;</p> <p>Suddenly, the conversation turned to teacher certifications and shortages, not just in rural communities, but state-wide, as well. The Capital Times recently reported that state officials estimate a nearly 30 percent enrollment decline in teacher education programs since 2010.</p> <p>Dachel, the only computer science teacher north of Highway 64, knows firsthand the critical need for more STEM teachers. She is working with her district to grow more teachers from within through professional development. &ldquo;we&rsquo;re not going to poach a computer science guru out of the industry,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;We can&rsquo;t compete with that salary. So we have to find a way to grow existing teachers or grow community members to become teachers. And that&rsquo;s what we need legislative help on.&rdquo;</p> <p>Roberts believes teacher shortages are a public relations problem. &ldquo;We need to find a way to make teaching a desirable profession again for those in college,&rdquo; he stated. After the applause died down, he added, &ldquo;We all know it is a very rewarding career, but sometimes it is a hard sell.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Gerlach agreed, but said he is grateful for the connections he made at Teacher Speakout! The realization that &ldquo;we&rsquo;re all in this together&rdquo; was the big takeaway for the 2018 Wisconsin Rural Teacher of the Year. &ldquo;We all have unique challenges as rural teachers. But we are all experiencing success, too,&rdquo; he said.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:37d5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/12/hawkins-honored-with-international-organization-s-digital-literacy-game-changer-award Hawkins honored with international organization's Digital Literacy Game Changer AwardMaggie Hawkins, a professor with the School of Education’s Department of Curriculum and Instruction, was honored with the International Literacy Association's ​(ILA) Erwin Zolt Digital Literacy Game Changer Award. Hawkins’s work focuses on languages, literacies, and learning in classrooms and schools, while striving for equity and social justice. Thu, 12 Dec 2019 11:30:00 Z<p>Maggie Hawkins, a professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/" title="C&amp;I website" target="_blank">Department of Curriculum and Instruction</a>, was honored with the International Literacy Association's (ILA) Erwin Zolt Digital Literacy Game Changer Award.&nbsp;</p> <p>Hawkins&rsquo;s work focuses on languages, literacies, and learning in classrooms and schools, while striving for equity and social justice.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/maggie-hawkins-250-px-sq.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Maggie Hawkins" displaymode="Original" title="Maggie Hawkins 250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Hawkins </figcaption> </figure> </div> At UW-Madison, Hawkins has been involved in many teacher education initiatives and worked with schools and universities in less developed countries to improve literacy instruction, create and sustain libraries in schools and communities, and provide professional development to teachers.&nbsp;</p> <p>Her project, <a href="http://www.globalstorybridges.com/" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">Global StoryBridges</a>, works with under resourced communities in 17 countries across Asia, Central America, North America, Africa, and Europe. Global StoryBridges supports youth in developing technology, language, and literacy skills, while also providing a platform to share their lives and communities with other youth across the world.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;I would like to see Global StoryBridges continue to expand, along with the newly formed international research team we have assembled,&rdquo; Hawkins says in the Literacy World Wide press release. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m hoping that we can come to understand how youth from different languages and cultural backgrounds, living in disparate regions and communities, make sense of messages that travel between them, and thus of one another.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hawkins emphasizes global issues and citizenship, recommending that educators keep social justice as a foundational part of their curriculum. <br /> <br /> &ldquo;It&rsquo;s so easy to become immersed in the day-to-day routines and demands, and yet our students need to become citizens of the world,&rdquo; Hawkins tells Literacy World Wide. &ldquo;It enhances their futures and it offers an excellent lens for understanding themselves and others.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Read Literacy World Wide's press release <a href="http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/f9abbd6e#/f9abbd6e/20" title="LWW press release" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:26d5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/11/uw-madison-s-production-of--into-the-woods--honored-by-national-opera-association UW–Madison's production of ‘Into the Woods’ honored by National Opera AssociationThe National Opera Association has named the production of “Into the Woods” — which was co-produced by UW–Madison’s University Theatre and University Opera — as first place winner in the Opera Production Competition in Division IV for the 2018-19 season.Wed, 11 Dec 2019 10:19:00 Z<p>The National Opera Association (NOA) has named the production of &ldquo;Into the Woods&rdquo; &mdash; which was co-produced by UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s University Theatre and <a href="https://www.music.wisc.edu/opera/" title="University Opera page" target="_blank">University Opera</a> &mdash; as first place winner in the Opera Production Competition in Division IV for the 2018-19 season.</p> <p>Divisions are based on graduate/undergraduate participation, cast, and budgetary considerations in order to compare productions fairly.</p> <p>The NOA Production Competition entries are judged in the following categories: musicianship (accuracy and musical integrity); quality of singing (as appropriate to the style); diction (clarity and accuracy); dramatic credibility and characterization; production concept, staging, and execution; and quality of the production (relative to the budget).</p> <p>Congratulations to Director David Ronis, Conductor Chad Hutchinson, the cast, designers, production team, orchestra, and the <a href="https://theatre.wisc.edu/" title="Dept. of Theatre and Drama website" target="_blank">Department of Theatre and Drama</a> and the <a href="https://www.music.wisc.edu/" title="School of Music website" target="_blank">Mead Witter School of Music</a> on an outstanding achievement.</p> <p>More information on the NOA and the Production Competition can be found&nbsp;<a href="https://www.noa.org/competitions/opera-production.html">here</a>.<br /> <br /> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/into-the-woods.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Into the Woods Poster 2019" title="Into the Woods" class="FloatImageLeft" /></p>urn:uuid:47d5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/10/tandem-press-holiday-open-house-and-sale-on-dec--14 Tandem Press Holiday Open House and Sale on Dec. 14The 2019 Tandem Press Holiday Open House and Sale will be held on Dec. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Tandem Press facility at 1743 Commercial Avenue. Tue, 10 Dec 2019 10:41:00 Z<p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/tandem-press-sale.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Tandem Press Sale" title="Tandem Press sale" class="FloatImageRight" />The 2019 Tandem Press Holiday Open House and Sale will be held on Dec. 14 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Tandem Press&nbsp;facility at 1743 Commercial Ave.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://tandempress.wisc.edu/" title="Tandem Press website" target="_blank">Tandem Press</a>, founded in 1987, is affiliated with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" title="Art Dept. website" target="_blank">Art Department</a>. The organization brings in artists who use its facilities to create editions of prints and interact with graduate and undergraduate students. The Press is one of the only professional presses affiliated with a university in the United States, and is internationally renowned.&nbsp;</p> <p>The event, which is free and open to the public, will feature printmaking demonstrations and a selection of prints for sale in the gallery.<br /> <br /> View the event facebook page <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/632334117301666/" title="Tandem Press Holiday Open House event page" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:b1d4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/09/carr-publishes-book-on-women-during-the-civil-war-with-university-press Carr publishes book on women during the Civil War with University Press Jo Ann Carr, director emerita of the School of Education's Media, Education Resources, and Information Technology (MERIT), has recently published “Such Anxious Hours: Wisconsin Women’s Voices from the Civil War,” with the University of Wisconsin Press. The book includes an illustration of Wisconsin in 1861 created by Linda Endlich, graphic artist in the School of Education’s Office of Communications and Advancement.Mon, 09 Dec 2019 11:07:00 Z<p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/carr-book.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Carr book cover" title="Carr Book" class="FloatImageRight" />Jo Ann Carr, director emerita of the School of Education's&nbsp;<a href="https://merit.education.wisc.edu" title="MERIT website" target="_blank">Media, Education Resources, and Information Technology</a> (MERIT), has recently published&nbsp;&ldquo;Such Anxious Hours: Wisconsin Women&rsquo;s Voices from the Civil War,&rdquo;<em>&nbsp;</em>with the University of Wisconsin Press. &nbsp;</p> <p>Carr provides a chronicle of Civil&nbsp;War Wisconsin by placing the words of eight Wisconsin women in the national, state, and local context of the war.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book includes an illustration of Wisconsin in 1861 created by Linda Endlich, graphic artist in the School of Education&rsquo;s Office of Communications and Advancement.</p>urn:uuid:a9d4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/06/cap-times-reports-on-rural-education-research-and-implementation-center-s--teacher-speakout- Cap Times reports on Rural Education Research and Implementation Center's 'Teacher Speakout!'In a recent article, The Capital Times newspaper put the spotlight on UW-Madison’s Rural Education Research and Implementation Center (RERIC), which is housed within the School of Education’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER). For their third annual "Teacher Speakout!" event, RERIC hosted 19 teachers from rural Wisconsin districts at UW-Madison.Fri, 06 Dec 2019 11:50:00 Z<p>In a recent article, The Capital Times newspaper put the spotlight on UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://reric.wisc.edu/" title="RERIC website" target="_blank">Rural Education Research and Implementation Center</a> (RERIC), which is housed within the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="WCER website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>&nbsp;(WCER).&nbsp;</p> <p>For their third annual "Teacher Speakout!" event, RERIC hosted 19 teachers from rural Wisconsin districts at UW-Madison.</p> <p>Now the assistant director of RERIC, Jennifer Seelig attended the first-ever Teacher Speakout!.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/reric-logodacec237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="RERIC logo" title="RERIC-logo" class="FloatImageRight" />&ldquo;Centering teachers&rsquo; voices would be an effective way to engage them with research we&rsquo;re already doing at WCER, as well as interest researchers in connecting with teachers,&rdquo; Seeling said to The Capital Times on the event&rsquo;s origins. &ldquo;Folks often don&rsquo;t think of rural schools as places to do research.&rdquo;</p> <p>Many teachers who attended the event spoke about some of the unique opportunities at rural schools, according to the newspaper. Science and math teacher Jessica Dennis, who teaches in Washington Island, incorporates the natural features around the district in her lesson plans.&nbsp;</p> <p>Jacob Roberts, another science instructor, teaches in the Pecatonica Area School District. Roberts also takes advantage of the area&rsquo;s natural features in his lesson plans, referencing the Pecatonica River during lessons on broader topics, like climate change.</p> <p>During the panel, which was moderated by Seelig, teachers discussed questions about higher education, including how universities can better engage teachers in grant proposals. Many teachers brought fruitful suggestions to the table &mdash; such as removing barriers like transportation when hosting events, or providing resources to help teachers sort through grant opportunities.&nbsp;</p> <p>Though there are many researchers on campus interested in rural parts of the state, WCER Director Bob Mathieu believes that RERIC can offer a &ldquo;place of connection,&rdquo; so that researchers and teachers across the state can work together more efficiently.&nbsp;</p> Read the full Capital Times report via <a href="https://madison.com/ct/news/local/education/university/rural-wisconsin-stem-teachers-build-connections-to-researchers-at-uw/article_422a7bac-07e1-11ea-b840-0fe55dd829f8.html" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">this madison.com web page</a>.urn:uuid:3fd5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/05/uw-madison-glass-lab-holiday-sale-on-dec--14-15 UW–Madison Glass Lab Holiday Sale on Dec. 14-15The 2019 UW-Madison Glass Lab Holiday Sale will be held Dec. 14-15, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Art Lofts at 111 N Frances St. The Glass Lab is a part of the Art Department, which is housed within the School of Education. The public is welcome to attend and are invited to watch live glassblowing all weekend. Unique ornaments hand-crafted by students will be available for purchase. Thu, 05 Dec 2019 11:35:00 Z<p>The 2019 UW-Madison Glass Lab Holiday Sale will be held Dec. 14-15, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Art Lofts at 111 N Frances St. <br /> <br /> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/uw-glass-lab-sale.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="UW Glass Lab sale" title="UW Glass Lab Sale" class="FloatImageRight" />The <a href="https://glasslab.art.wisc.edu/" title="Glass Lab website" target="_blank">Glass Lab</a> is a part of the <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" title="Art Dept. website" target="_blank">Art Department</a>, which is housed within the School of Education.</p> <p>The public is welcome to attend and are invited to watch live glassblowing all weekend. Unique ornaments hand-crafted by students will be available for purchase.&nbsp;</p> <p>All proceeds of the holiday sale go towards UW Glass students to further their education by supporting field trips, visiting artist dinners, and supplies.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> For complete details, view the event's Facebook page <a href="https://www.facebook.com/events/741067643063431/" title="Glass Lab Holiday Sale Facebook Event" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:f3d0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/04/state-journal-speaks-with-uw-madison-s-goff-about-grading-floors State Journal speaks with UW-Madison’s Goff about grading floorsThe Wisconsin State Journal interviewed UW-Madison’s Peter Goff for a report examining the trial implementation of grading floors in Madison schools. Goff is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis.Wed, 04 Dec 2019 11:21:00 Z<p>The Wisconsin State Journal interviewed UW-Madison&rsquo;s Peter Goff for a report examining the&nbsp;trial implementation of grading floors in Madison schools.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Goff is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/peter-goff-150-px7350c037c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Goff" displaymode="Original" title="peter-goff-150-px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Goff </figcaption> </figure> </div> Madison West High School was selected to test a grading floor as a part of a district examination of freshman grading, in an effort to keep students who fail early in high school from failing out of school completely. As a part of the program, the State Journal reports that ninth grade teachers will give grades no lower than 40 percent, eliminate extra credit, and allow up to 90 percent credit for late work required in classes.&nbsp;</p> <p>Changes like this can help struggling students catch up in a class and stay on track before reaching the point at which they won&rsquo;t be able to pass, the report explains. West High Principal Karen Boran told the State Journal that moving the grading floor could be particularly meaningful for students of color, students with disabilities, and English-language learners who have higher course failure rates.&nbsp;</p> <p>Goff explains to the State Journal that opponents to grading floors often argue they lower academic expectations or say that if students don&rsquo;t hand in assignments &mdash; and therefore don&rsquo;t meet the requirements of a class &mdash; they shouldn&rsquo;t be able to pass.</p> <p>Supporters argue grading floors give struggling students a chance to catch up in a class before falling to a point at which, mathematically, they can&rsquo;t pass, Goff adds.</p> <p> Goff &mdash; who is skeptical of the percentage-based grading system as a whole &mdash; tells the newspaper that he doesn&rsquo;t lean one way or the other on grading floors but supports grading policies that &ldquo;keep kids engaged and involved.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> ​To learn more about this nuanced topic, check out the entire&nbsp;State Journal report&nbsp;<a href="https://madison.com/wsj/news/local/education/local_schools/west-high-school-to-test-grading-floor-as-part-of/article_d9a941e6-f7e8-54f2-86b9-92083c1c5c35.html" title="WSJ article" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:1bd5c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/03/jordan-s-paintings-featured-at-overture-center-dec--10-to-march-1 Jordan’s paintings featured at Overture Center Dec. 10 to March 1The work of UW–Madison’s Jerry Jordan will be showcased at the Overture Center Dec. 10 through March 1. Jordan, a recruitment and retention specialist with the School of Education’s Student Diversity Programs Office, will have his paintings showcased in Gallery II in an exhibition titled, “Human Identity Portrait Stories.” A reception for the artists will be held Friday, Jan. 10, from 6 to 8 p.m.Tue, 03 Dec 2019 17:19:51 Z<p>The work of UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Jerry Jordan will be showcased at the Overture Center Dec. 10 through March 1.</p> <p>Jordan, a recruitment and retention specialist with the School of Education&rsquo;s Student Diversity Programs Office, will have his paintings showcased in Gallery II in an exhibition titled, &ldquo;Human Identity Portrait Stories.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/overture_galleries_winter2019_ii_650x325.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Gallery II show" displaymode="Original" title="overture_galleries_winter2019_ii_650x325" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">The work (left-to-right) of Yongchul Kwon, Jerry Jordan<br /> and Natalie Ergas will be showcased in the Overture<br /> Center&rsquo;s Gallery II Dec. 10 through March 1.</figcaption> </figure> </div> A preview explains: &ldquo;Natalie Ergas, Yongchul Kwon and Jerry Jordan explore different facets of human identity. Ergas uses collage to capture the essence of individuals, focusing on female strength and stories. Kwon is a sculptor who interrogates the role of anonymity within society. Jordan&rsquo;s paintings celebrate wokeness in defiance of ancient beliefs fueled by fear, hate, and cruelty.&rdquo;</p> <p>In the Overture Center's Galleries I, II, and III, a total of seven artists explore themes of identity, social context, and creative process.&nbsp; A reception for all of the artists will be held Friday, Jan. 10, from 6 to 8 p.m.</p> <p>Overture Center&rsquo;s four galleries create a forum for diverse artistic expression that fosters the growth of local artists, curators and arts organizations. Three galleries radiate off Rotunda Lobby and the Playhouse Gallery serves as lobby for The Playhouse Theater. Overture Galleries are free and open to the public.</p>urn:uuid:fdd0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/03/lingnan-peking-wisconsin-forum-explores-higher-education--talents--and-employment-in-global-bay-areas Lingnan-Peking-Wisconsin forum explores higher education, talents, and employment in global bay areasOn Nov. 11, faculty and graduate students from UW-Madison, Lingnan University, and Peking University, among scholars from other institutions, gathered at the Lingnan-Peking-Wisconsin Education Forum in Hong Kong to discuss higher education, talent training, and employment of global bay areas. UW-Madison's Adam Nelson, a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor with the Department of Educational Policy Studies, played a leading role in the event.Tue, 03 Dec 2019 11:38:00 Z<p>On Nov. 11, faculty and graduate students from UW-Madison, Lingnan University, and Peking University, among scholars from other institutions, gathered at the Lingnan-Peking-Wisconsin Education Forum in Hong Kong to discuss higher education, talent training, and employment of global bay areas. &nbsp;</p> <p>The forum, co-organized by UW-Madison, Lingnan University, Peking University, and the Asia Pacific Higher Education Research Partnership (APHERP), aimed to promote research and foster academic exchange, according to Lingnan University&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.ln.edu.hk/research-and-impact/whatsnews/lingnan-peking-wisconsin-education-forum" title="LNU news release" target="_blank">news release</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/adam-nelson.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Adam Nelson" displaymode="Original" title="Adam Nelson " /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Adam Nelson </figcaption> </figure> </div> The news release explains how the event kicked off with remarks from professor Ka Ho Mok, vice president of Lingnan University; Professor Fenggiao Yan, dean of Peking University&rsquo;s Graduate School of Education; and UW-Madison's Adam Nelson, a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor with the Department of Educational Policy Studies.&nbsp;</p> <p>Nelson and Yan both delivered keynote speeches, alongside Professor Dean Neubauer from the East-West Center. The three professors shared research on the modernization of Chinese education, higher education human capital in the New York bay area, and the impact of emerging information and knowledge transformation on higher education, according to Lingnan University&rsquo;s release.</p> <p>Included in the program were three panels, featuring faculty members, researchers, and graduate students from various universities as presenters. The panels covered topics including the role of universities in bay area development, knowledge sharing and social justice, and rethinking higher education and talent cultivation.&nbsp;</p> <p>Following the success of this year&rsquo;s forum, Peking University will host the next Lingnan-Peking-Wisconsin Education Forum in October 2020.<br /> <br /> View a video of the forum <a href="https://youtu.be/95ecnGjKWMs" title="LPWE Forum video" target="_blank">here</a>.<br /> <br /> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/ocpa0072.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Lingnan-Peking-Wisconsin Education Forum in Hong Kong" title="OCPA0072" class="FloatImageLeft" /></p>urn:uuid:3dcdc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/12/02/uw-madison-s-mead-named-vice-president-of-education-law-association UW-Madison’s Mead named vice president of Education Law AssociationUW-Madison’s Julie Mead was named the vice president of the Education Law Association (ELA) at the organization’s annual conference on Nov. 13-16 in Norfolk, Virginia. Mead is the School of Education’s associate dean for education, and a professor with the School’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. After her term as vice president, Mead will serve as the president elect and then president of the organization. Mon, 02 Dec 2019 11:50:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Julie Mead was named the vice president of the <a href="https://educationlaw.org" title="ELA website" target="_blank">Education Law Association</a> (ELA) at the organization&rsquo;s annual conference on Nov. 13-16 in Norfolk, Virginia.&nbsp;</p> <p>Mead is the School of Education&rsquo;s associate dean for education, and a professor with the School&rsquo;s <a href="http://elpa.education.wisc.edu" title="ELPA website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/julie-meada6b4c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Julie Mead" displaymode="Original" title="Julie Mead" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Mead </figcaption> </figure> </div> Her research focuses on topics related to the legal aspects of education, specifically legal issues related to special education and legal issue raised by various forms of school choice.&nbsp;</p> <p>After her one-year term as vice president, Mead will serve the following year as the president elect and then president of the organization. During her term, she will serve on the ELA Board of Directors and their executive committee.</p> <p>The ELA, founded in 1954, promotes itself as the premier forum for professionals in education who are interested in practical knowledge, scholarship, and interdisciplinary dialogue about legal and policy issues affecting education. &nbsp;</p> <p>A national, non-profit member association, ELA offers unbiased information to members about current legal issues affecting education and the rights of those involved in education.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:45cdc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/29/vetways-explores-academic-and-career-pathways-of-military-service-members--veterans VETWAYS explores academic and career pathways of military service members, veteransA new research project focused on the experience of undergraduate military service members and veterans enrolled in Wisconsin universities has recently been launched at the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER), part of UW-Madison’s School of Education. The Veteran Education to Workforce Affinity and Success Study (VETWAYS), a three-year, $556,000 project funded by the National Science Foundation, will seek to better understand the unique social experiences and challenges this student population encounters as they progress through college and into the workforce. Fri, 29 Nov 2019 11:52:00 Z<p>A new research project focused on the experience of undergraduate military service members and veterans enrolled in Wisconsin universities has recently been launched at the <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="WCER website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>&nbsp;(WCER), part of UW-Madison&rsquo;s School of Education.</p> <p>The <a href="https://projects.wcer.wisc.edu/vetways/" title="VETWAYS project page" target="_blank">Veteran Education to Workforce Affinity and Success Study</a> (VETWAYS), a three-year, $556,000 project funded by the National Science Foundation, will seek to better understand the unique social experiences and challenges this student population encounters as they progress through college and into the workforce.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/benbow-ross2.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Ross Benbow" displaymode="Original" title="Benbow-Ross2" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Benbow </figcaption> </figure> </div> While other studies conducted on student veterans show that social support is important to improving their college experiences, very little research has focused on the relationships that provide them with help, advice, camaraderie, or guidance, according to Ross Benbow, the study&rsquo;s principal investigator. <br /> <br /> &ldquo;Social support has come up as a particularly important factor linked to college success in other studies of student veterans," says Benbow. "Our work, which explores how social support connects with students&rsquo; college-to-career trajectories, is an important step in the progression of this research.&rdquo;</p> <p>Benbow says that student veterans in college face two unique sets of challenges.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Transitions into college from a military life marked by discipline, chains of command, and a special unity of purpose can be incredibly difficult,&rdquo; he explains, adding that feelings of isolation on campus, coupled with the many bureaucratic hurdles student veterans in college have to jump, can adversely affect persistence.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Veterans are also more likely to be from traditionally disadvantaged groups than other students, including first-generation students, students of color, and older and married students with more off-campus responsibility," says Benbow. "Student vets are more likely to suffer from trauma due to military experiences than traditional students, as well.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> These characteristics, the lead VETWAYS investigator points out, have been linked to lower college graduation rates.&nbsp;</p> <p>Joseph Rasmussen,&nbsp;Veteran Services Coordinator with UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://veterans.wisc.edu/" title="UVS website" target="_blank">University Veteran Services</a>, is an advisory board member for the new study.&nbsp;&ldquo;I am thrilled about the Veteran Education to Workforce Affinity and Success Study. UW-Madison has a strong tradition of public service and research, and this study honors both,&rdquo; says Rasmussen, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m excited to see the positive real-world impacts these findings will hold for student military service members and veterans, as well as for professionals looking to serve them.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Benbow agrees that VETWAYS can help college administrators and student services professionals&mdash;whether veteran coordinators, career counselors, academic advisors, faculty&nbsp;or other higher education practitioners&mdash;shape curricular and programming offerings to better meet the needs of undergraduate military service members and veterans.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;When you&rsquo;re looking at higher education and the country&rsquo;s future workforce needs, as my colleagues and I are doing, this is an incredibly skilled, capable,&nbsp;and deserving group of students to focus on,&rdquo; Benbow says. &ldquo;Colleges and future employers should be competing over these students, so we&rsquo;re excited to play a small part in better understanding and hopefully improving their academic and early-career experiences.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:d7cbc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/27/dance-department-presents-kloepper-concert-of-new-student-work-dec--7-8 Dance Department presents Kloepper Concert of new student work Dec. 7-8The School of Education’s Dance Department presents the annual Kloepper Concert, a studio performance of new student work, in the historic Louise Kloepper Studio, Lathrop Hall at 8 p.m. on Dec. 7 and 2:30 p.m. on Dec 8. In this concert, 12 student choreographers, including Akiwele Burayidi, Audrey Glock, Cassie Last, Lauren Lynch, Ellie McShane, Courtney Kopchinski, Amanda Kolsch, Shayna Valianos, Jessica Jacobs, Veda Manly, Tye Trondson, and Brooke Schroeder, will present a mix of solo and ensemble works. Wed, 27 Nov 2019 11:30:00 Z<p>The School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://dance.wisc.edu/" title="Dance Dept. website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a> presents the annual Kloepper Concert, a studio performance of new student work, in the historic Louise Kloepper Studio, Lathrop Hall, at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7 and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, Dec 8.</p> <p>In this concert, 12 student choreographers &mdash; including Akiwele Burayidi, Audrey Glock, Cassie Last, Lauren Lynch, Ellie McShane, Courtney Kopchinski, Amanda Kolsch, Shayna Valianos, Jessica Jacobs, Veda Manly, Tye Trondson, and Brooke Schroeder &mdash; will present a mix of solo and ensemble works.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/kloepper-concert-2019-dance27ccc237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="2019 Kloepper Concert" title="Kloepper Concert 2019 Dance" class="FloatImageRight" />The concert will also feature an ensemble piece from the First Year Workshop, a collaborative piece from first-year dance degree students directed by Kate Corby, associated professor and chair of the Dance Department.</p> <p>Immediately following the Saturday, Dec. 7, performance, a reception will be held in Lathrop Hall&rsquo;s Virginia Harrison Parlor.</p> <p>The concert is named for Louise Kloepper, a former chair of the Dance Department. Kloepper came to UW-Madison to study dance in 1942, after almost a decade of teaching and dancing with the Hanya Holm School and Company. She was the first dance professional admitted as a student.</p> <p>The same year she graduated, 1946, she became an assistant professor for the department. She was a distinguished teacher of dance technique and composition, serving as artistic director and producer for many faculty-student presentations.&nbsp;</p> <p>Professor Emerita Anna Nassif said Kloepper was &ldquo;a humanist who followed the ideas of John Dewey and Margaret H&rsquo;Doubler,&rdquo; someone who &ldquo;put her faith in each student&rsquo;s ability and talent to grow into a teacher, artist, therapist by his or her own effort and motivation.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Tickets will be available at the door one hour before the performance for $10, cash only. Seating is very limited.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:4fcdc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/26/health-and-education--uw-madison-research-shows-more-schooling-equals-longer--healthier-lives UW-Madison research shows more schooling equals longer, healthier livesA critical intersection exists between education and health, according to a consensus of researchers and evaluators from UW–Madison who have been working closely with rural schools, the community-school model, and Native American communities in Wisconsin.Tue, 26 Nov 2019 11:56:00 Z<p>A critical intersection exists between education and health, according to a consensus of researchers and evaluators from the&nbsp;<a href="http://wisc.edu/" target="_blank">University of Wisconsin‒Madison</a>&nbsp;who have been working closely with rural schools, the community-school model, and Native American communities in Wisconsin.</p> <p>&ldquo;Better educated individuals live longer, healthier lives than those with less education, and their children are more likely to thrive&mdash;even when factors like income are taken into account,&rdquo; says&nbsp;<a href="https://uwphi.pophealth.wisc.edu/staff/odegaard-mph-karen/" target="_blank">Karen Odegaard,</a>&nbsp;associate researcher at the&nbsp;<a href="https://uwphi.pophealth.wisc.edu/" target="_blank">UW Population Health Institute</a>, which developed the&nbsp;<a href="https://uwphi.pophealth.wisc.edu/chrr/" target="_blank">County Health Rankings &amp; Roadmaps</a>&nbsp;to spotlight the relationship between education and health across the nation.</p> <p>According to this extensive study, college graduates on average live nine years longer than high-school dropouts. &ldquo;Higher levels of education can lead to a greater sense of control over one&rsquo;s life, which is then linked to better health, healthier lifestyle decisions and fewer chronic illnesses,&rdquo; it asserts.</p> <p>What&rsquo;s more, findings showed that more schooling is linked to better job opportunities, increased social supports, and higher income, with each additional year of schooling yielding 11 percent more income annually.</p> <h3>Well-being challenges in rural schools</h3> <p>The reverse also is true, as children and youth with unaddressed mental and behavioral health issues encounter more school challenges that lead to short- and long-term life consequences.</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/reric-logodacec237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="RERIC logo" title="RERIC-logo" class="FloatImageRight" />At the&nbsp;<a href="https://reric.wisc.edu/" target="_blank">Rural Education Research and Implementation Center</a>&nbsp;(RERIC), a project at the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/About/Staff/10">Craig Albers</a>&nbsp;and his team are studying the self-identified needs of Wisconsin&rsquo;s rural schools.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;The most common, most frequently mentioned issue is mental and behavioral health,&rdquo; says Albers. &ldquo;If a child is not strong emotionally or doesn&rsquo;t have mental-health wellness, then this has trickle-down effects to academics, and disciplinary referrals and issues. It increases the likelihood of disengagement, school drop-out.&rdquo;</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a growing problem for all schools, but districts in more isolated parts of the state show more unmet mental health need, RERIC&rsquo;s research shows. Reasons include lack of access, fewer school and community resources, and more difficulty hiring, training, and retaining mental health professionals.</p> <p>Surveys done by RERIC show 87-90 percent of Wisconsin principals in rural areas in Wisconsin reported that students in the past 12 months who needed mental health services did not receive them.</p> <p>These challenges grow, says Albers, as students whose mental health needs are unmet age into adults. National studies reveal they are more likely to develop significant mental health problems in adulthood, be involved in the criminal justice system, and have interpersonal and relationship problems.</p> <h3>How health plays into community schools</h3> <p>WCER researcher and evaluator&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/About/Staff/1547" target="_blank">Annalee Good&nbsp;</a>and doctoral candidate&nbsp;<a href="https://morgridge.wisc.edu/students/awards/excellence-in-engaged-scholarship-award/" target="_blank">Marlo Reeves</a>&nbsp;have examined how the community school model works to coordinate health and educational opportunities for students and families.<br /> <br /> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/good-annalee.jpg?sfvrsn=2" alt="Annalee Good" displaymode="Original" title="good-annalee" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Good</figcaption> </figure> </div> Community schools offer an expanded array of social services and other programs based around the model&rsquo;s four main pillars: integrated student supports, expanded and enriched learning time, active family and community engagement, and collaborative leadership and practices.</p> <p>&ldquo;One of the things that&rsquo;s most promising about the community schools model is that it&rsquo;s a community&rsquo;s response to a community&rsquo;s identification of their own needs,&rdquo; says Good, co-director of WCER&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="http://wec.wceruw.org/" target="_blank">Wisconsin Evaluation Collaborative</a>. &ldquo;Often it results in communities being really innovative.&rdquo;</p> <p>For instance, four community schools in Madison have responded to a need for health services and family counseling by setting up a mobile community flu clinic through a partnership with&nbsp;<a href="https://www.madison.k12.wi.us/" target="_blank">Madison Metropolitan School District,</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.hy-vee.com/" target="_blank">Hy-Vee</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.unitedwaydanecounty.org/" target="_blank">United Way</a>,&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.publichealthmdc.com/" target="_blank">Dane County Public Health</a>. &ldquo;The idea came from parents who lacked access to getting their kids vaccinated,&rdquo; says Aronn Peterson, the district&rsquo;s community schools manager. &ldquo;Getting the flu does lead to missed school time and absenteeism for students.&rdquo;</p> <p>Other examples of health-related programs in the district included a six-week running and walking club at&nbsp;<a href="https://lakeview.madison.k12.wi.us/" target="_blank">Lake View Elementary School</a>&nbsp;that nearly all students took part in; and UW Health-sponsored wellness days for staff and students.</p> <h3>Tackling tribal health disparities</h3> <p>Wisconsin Native Americans face their own unique health and education disparities, according to WCER researcher and evaluator&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/About/Staff/3229" target="_blank">Nicole Bowman</a>, a Mohican/Munsee, and&nbsp;<a href="https://www.unlv.edu/people/carolee-dodge-francis" target="_blank">Carolee Dodge Francis</a>, an associate professor at the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.unlv.edu/" target="_blank">University of Nevada</a>&nbsp;and member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin. Both scholars have extensive experience with culturally responsive approaches to evaluation research with tribal nations.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/nicolebowman-768x1024.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Nicole Bowman-Farrell" displaymode="Original" title="NicoleBowman-768x1024" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Bowman </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;Natives in Wisconsin have four times the diagnosis and mortality rate for Type-2 diabetes and on average die at age 63 compared to age 77 for whites,&rdquo; says Bowman. What&rsquo;s more, infant mortality rates for Native American children are 69 percent higher than white children and Native children have the highest age-adjusted suicide rate (at 2.5 deaths per 100,000) across all races.</p> <p>Compounding this health crisis is the fact that fewer Native children in Wisconsin complete high school&mdash;86 percent compared to 91 percent for all races&mdash;and only 13.8 percent had a bachelor&rsquo;s degree or more, compared to 28.43 percent for all races, according to the Great Lakes Inter-Tribal Epidemiology Center.</p> <p>&ldquo;We have to do our work differently in order to have different outcomes,&rdquo; Bowman says. Keys to working differently with the state&rsquo;s 11 federally recognized tribes include the need for researchers to expand their on-the-ground experiential knowledge and deepen social networks to build trust among members.</p> <p>&ldquo;Doing focus groups is very different than having a meal with subjects,&rdquo; Bowman counsels researchers. &ldquo;It might seem like a simple step, but just get out there, get some fresh air, get out of your office. We have to experience life with the folks we are serving.&rdquo;</p> <h3>It takes a village</h3> <p>As Odegaard suggests, it will take the collective effort of communities, educators, and researchers, like those at WCER and UW‒Madison, to work together to increase educational attainment for children and adults, better preparing the individuals and families of today and tomorrow to live longer, healthier lives.</p> <p>&ldquo;The quality of our homes, the safety of our neighborhoods, and our chance for a good education all have a major role to play in how long and how well we live,&rdquo; she says.</p>urn:uuid:dfcbc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/25/abdu-allah-noted-in-muse-s-memoriam-of-curator-silva Abdu’Allah noted in Muse’s memoriam of curator SilvaUW-Madison’s Faisal Abdu’Allah, an associate professor with the School Education’s Art Department and faculty director of The Studio, was mentioned in Muse’s memoriam of well-known art curator Olabisi Obafunke Silva (known as Bisi), who Abdu’Allah credits with launching his art career in London. After working in London, Silva left the UK in 2000 to champion global arts of the African diaspora. Muse names Silva “one of the most important independent curators based within the continent of Africa and working across the continent and beyond.”Mon, 25 Nov 2019 11:30:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Faisal Abdu&rsquo;Allah, an associate professor with the School Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" title="Art Dept. website" target="_blank">Art Department</a> and faculty director of <a href="https://www.housing.wisc.edu/residence-halls/learning.../studio/" title="The Studio website" target="_blank">The Studio</a>, was mentioned in Muse&rsquo;s memoriam of well-known art curator Olabisi Obafunke Silva (known as Bisi), who Abdu&rsquo;Allah credits with launching his art career in London.&nbsp;</p> <p>After working in London, Silva left the UK in 2000 to champion global arts of the African diaspora. Muse names Silva &ldquo;one of the most important independent curators based within the continent of Africa and working across the continent and beyond.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/faisal-abduallah6e71c037c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="faisal-abduallah" displaymode="Original" title="faisal-abduallah" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Faisal Abdu'Allah </figcaption> </figure> </div> Born in Lagos, Nigeria in 1962, Silva earned her undergraduate degree in France, with her formal training as a curator taking place in the mid-1990s, when she was a part of the first cohorts to enroll in London&rsquo;s Royal College of Art Visual Arts Administration Master of Arts Program.&nbsp;</p> <p>She established a project known as Fourth Dial Art, &ldquo;a non-profit intercultural organization committed to the development, production, presentation, and distribution of the visual arts.&rdquo; This program was responsible for Abdu&rsquo;Allah&rsquo;s solo touring exhibition, "Heads of State." Muse names Abdu&rsquo;Allah as &ldquo;one of the most fascinating and accomplished artists to emerge from the London art world of the mid-1990s.&rdquo;</p> <p>In addition to Silva&rsquo;s success in the UK, she established the Centre for Contemporary Art in Lagos, which functioned as a gallery, library, archive, and center of learning, debate, conversation, and exchange. According to Muse, Silva single-handedly took on this work, reflective of her drive, energy, commitment, and heightened sense of intellectual engagement.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Read Muse's memoriam <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/article/738996" title="Muse memoriam" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:06cfc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/22/radomski-talks-with-madison-commons-about-trend-of-college-graduates-finding-careers-outside-their-majors Radomski talks with Madison Commons about trend of college graduates finding careers outside their majorsWISCAPE's Noel Radomski talked with the Madison Commons, a publication of the UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication, about the growing trend of college graduates finding careers in fields not strictly related to their majors. Fri, 22 Nov 2019 16:50:46 Z<div> <p>An article in the <a href="https://madisoncommons.org/2019/11/12/more-college-grads-land-jobs-outside-their-majors-and-thats-a-good-thing-experts-say/" data-hovercard="/ajax/hovercard/page.php?id=139201739465324&amp;extragetparams=%7B%22__tn__%22%3A%22%2CdK-R-R%22%2C%22eid%22%3A%22ARCb_XTX2Oo2zq0cDBNh68Ct-1ZlrgaCsaFAgzMBoilCYAwJhdxTyI5IdjCd_-xHMk6vGrdqs-zpPb_K%22%2C%22fref%22%3A%22mentions%22%7D" data-hovercard-prefer-more-content-show="1" title="Visit Madison Commons website to view article" target="_blank">Madison Commons</a>, ​a publication of the <a href="https://journalism.wisc.edu/" title="Visit School of Journalism website" target="_blank">UW-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication</a>, reports that many college graduates are finding careers in fields not strictly related to their majors.<br /> <br /> "According to a 2013 <a target="_blank" href="https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/05/do-big-cities-help-college-graduates-find-better-jobs.html">study</a> conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York," the article explains, "only 27 percent of college graduates landed a job closely related to their majors." The trend is growing for students with Bachelor of Arts degrees, which often don't point to a particular career path. </p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/noel_radomski150px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Noel Radomski" title="noel_Radomski150px" style="float: right; margin-top: 5px; margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 15px;" />Noel Radomski​, the managing director of the <a href="http://wiscape.wisc.edu" title="Visit WISCAPE website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for the Advancement of Postsecondary Education (WISCAPE)</a>, ​is quoted in the article. He said state legislatures "have pushed public institutions reorienting back to majors like engineering and computer science as Mid​west rural areas were hit the hardest by the primary sector downturn over the past 40 years."<br /> <br /> &ldquo;I think the loudest voice of the business community in Wisconsin comes from Wisconsin Manufacturers and Commerce,&rdquo; the conservative-leaning statewide chamber of commerce, said Radomski​. &ldquo;You have the more established companies in Wisconsin, which tend to be heavy manufacturing. They tend to like careers in technical education.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> However, he continued, &ldquo;If you go and talk to more newer-established companies, they are arguing &lsquo;we need more liberal arts-minded students, we need students with strong liberal arts foundation.&rsquo;&rdquo;<br /> <br /> <a href="https://madisoncommons.org/2019/11/12/more-college-grads-land-jobs-outside-their-majors-and-thats-a-good-thing-experts-say/" title="Visit Madison Commons website to view article" target="_blank">Read the full article in the Madison Commons.</a> <br /> <br /> WISCAPE is housed in the <a target="_blank" title="Visit ELPA website" href="http://elpa.education.wisc.edu/">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a> (ELPA) within UW-Madison's&nbsp;School of Education. </p> </div>urn:uuid:ebc9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/22/thoughts-from-uw-madison-s-bruecker-on-fafsa-featured-on-wpr--edsource Thoughts from UW-Madison’s Bruecker on FAFSA featured on WPR, EdSourceThoughts on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form from UW-Madison’s Ellie Bruecker were featured on Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) and in an EdSource.com report. Bruecker, a doctoral student with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis, researches student loan borrowing and repayment, FAFSA filing, and the impact of high schools on college access. Bruecker is also a project assistant with UW-Madison’s Student Success Through Applied Research (SSTAR) Lab.Fri, 22 Nov 2019 11:31:00 Z<p>Thoughts on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form from UW-Madison&rsquo;s Ellie Bruecker were featured on Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) and in an EdSource.com report. &nbsp;</p> <p>Bruecker, a doctoral student with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>, researches student loan borrowing and repayment, FAFSA filing, and the impact of high schools on college access. Bruecker is also a project assistant with UW-Madison&rsquo;s Student Success Through Applied Research (SSTAR) Lab.</p> <p> FAFSA can help families pay for a college education. Bruecker reports that after three weeks of the FAFSA being available, 13 percent of 12th graders nation-wide have filed. She explains that by the end of the year, 62 percent of twelfth graders nation-wide will have filed.&nbsp;</p> <p>However, Bruecker tells WPR that filing rates in Wisconsin are usually lower. Last year, the overall filing rate in the state was 55 percent, which is below average compared to other states.&nbsp;</p> <p>Bruecker reports that this may be related to low-income or underserved schools, particularly rural schools. She explains that this is likely because there are less resources to go around and lower college enrollment rates. She also points out that rural schools&rsquo; distance from post-secondary institutions may be a factor in filing and enrollment rates.&nbsp;</p> <p>Researchers are looking for ways to increase filing rates, including efforts at the federal level to simplify the form. Some states have even instituted a mandate to complete the FAFSA application, according to the EdSource.com article. &nbsp;</p> <p>While Louisiana, Texas, and Illinois have already gone forward with this mandate, other states, like California, are still considering the idea. Proponents of the mandate say it will encourage those not already on the college-track to enroll, but Bruecker reminds that a requirements&rsquo; impact on college attendance remains uncertain. She adds that implementing a mandate should come with bolstered counseling to help students and their families understand their aid offers and make informed decisions.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Listen to the WPR segment <a href="https://www.wpr.org/fafsa-how-often-families-use-it-how-avoid-pitfalls?fbclid=IwAR2vvUdhjNpAjYddO-32-QIGU9Iqqe2CL15DM4-HjMIeSk0RJfy4lRK12c8" title="WPR segment" target="_blank">here</a>, and read the EdSource.com article <a href="https://edsource.org/2019/a-novel-idea-for-california-requiring-students-to-fill-out-financial-aid-forms/619373" title="EdSource.com article" target="_blank">here</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:e7cbc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/22/li-chiao-ping-s-performance-in--the-world-as-we-know-it--reviewed-by-pittsburgh-city-paper Li Chiao-Ping’s performance in 'The World as We Know It' reviewed by Pittsburgh City PaperA performance in CorningWork’s “The World as We Know It” from UW-Madison’s Li Chiao-Ping, a Vilas Research Professor with the School of Education’s Dance Department, was recently reviewed by Pittsburgh (PGH) City Paper. “The World as We Know It,” as described by Lisa Cunningham from the PGH City Paper, tells the stories of six women “of a certain age” in the context of the #MeToo movement and gender dynamics in the workplace. Fri, 22 Nov 2019 11:08:00 Z<p>A performance in CorningWork&rsquo;s &ldquo;The World as We Know It&rdquo; from UW-Madison&rsquo;s Li Chiao-Ping, a Vilas Research Professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu" title="Dance Dept. website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a>, was recently reviewed by Pittsburgh (PGH) City Paper.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The World as We Know It,&rdquo; as described by Lisa Cunningham from the PGH City Paper, tells the stories of six women &ldquo;of a certain age&rdquo; in the context of the #MeToo movement and gender dynamics in the workplace.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/li-chiao-ping.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Li Chiao-Ping" displaymode="Original" title="Li Chiao-Ping" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Li Chiao-Ping </figcaption> </figure> </div> The performers wore oversized pastel suits, which the dancers wear and remove numerous times throughout the production.&nbsp;</p> <p>Cunningham describes these women&rsquo;s performances as &ldquo;bare, raw, honest,&rdquo; as they shed their skin and find liberation. While she reports that most of the performances felt quiet and intimate, she found that the soundtrack broke up the silence in a haunting way.&nbsp;</p> <p>Some performances, like ​Li&rsquo;s, also included dialogue from the performers. In her performance, &ldquo;In Media Res,&rdquo; Cunningham describes Li&rsquo;s speech &ldquo;coming through almost as a stutter, as she struggles to climb to have a seat at the top of the proverbial table."<br /> <br /> Read the review <a href="https://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/review-corningworks-the-world-as-we-know-it-at-new-hazlett-theater/Content?oid=16078080" title="PGH City Paper review" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:c4cbc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/21/uw-madison-s-tansey-conducting-studies-on-how-best-to-support-employment-of-youth-with-disabilities UW-Madison’s Tansey conducting studies on how best to support employment of youth with disabilitiesTim Tansey, an associate professor with the School of Education’s Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education, will serve as the principal investigator (PI) on the UW-Madison sub-awards for two major new grant-funded projects. Virginia Commonwealth University Professor Paul Wehman is the PI on the two five-year, $4.4 million awards (total funding of $8.8 million) from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research in the U.S Department of Health and Human Services.Thu, 21 Nov 2019 11:30:00 Z<p>Tim Tansey, an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://rpse.education.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" title="RPSE website">Department of Rehabilitation Psychology and Special Education</a>, will serve as the principal investigator (PI) on the UW-Madison sub-awards for two major new grant-funded projects.</p> <p>Virginia Commonwealth University Professor Paul Wehman is the PI on the two five-year, $4.4 million awards (total funding of $8.8 million) from the&nbsp;<a href="https://acl.gov/about-acl/about-national-institute-disability-independent-living-and-rehabilitation-research">National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research</a>&nbsp;in the U.S Department of Health and Human Services. VCU will lead and coordinate a dozen studies across four universities, including Vanderbilt University and Kent State University, to conduct research on how to improve vocational readiness and employment outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as well as transition-age youth with disabilities.<br /> <br /> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/1089_dsc_7566.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Tim Tansey" displaymode="Original" title="1089_DSC_7566" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Tansey </figcaption> </figure> </div> Wehman is known for his pioneering work in the beginning of supported employment in 1980, a rehabilitation intervention strategy that has helped millions of people with neurodevelopmental disabilities, brain injury, mental illness, and spinal cord injury in countries around the world gain competitive employment.&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to Tansey, the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC)&nbsp;on Employment of Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IDD), under the project direction of Valerie Brooke (VCU), includes Fong Chan as the co-PI and Catherine Anderson and Ellie Hartman as co-investigators on the UW&ndash;Madison subaward. The RRTC on Employment of Transition Age Individuals with Disabilities project is under the direction of Elizabeth Getzel (VCU), with Anderson as a co-PI and Hartman as co-investigator.&nbsp;</p> <p>For the RRTC on Employment of Persons with Intellectual and Development Disabilities project, researchers at UW-Madison will conduct a study to identify the efficacy of a blended learning intervention program (TECH-Prep) to increase technology career interests and career readiness of African-American youth with developmental disabilities.</p> <p>The TECH-Prep program combines mentoring by professionals in STEM fields, training in basic coding, and paid internships with technology companies. Successful implementation of the program has the potential to identify new pathways of service delivery for vocational rehabilitation counselors and overall vocational achievement for you with IDD.</p> <p>The RRTC on Employment of Transition-Age Youth with Disabilities project seeks to identify best practices for supporting transition-age youth with disabilities in the workplace. Researchers will conduct qualitative case studies of youth with disabilities, their families, service providers, and their employers to better understand their lived experiences. The goals of this project are to identify the barriers to and facilitators of outcomes for transition-age youth with disabilities, as well as identifying existing practices, programs, or policies that are associated with employment outcomes.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:f8c9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/21/women-artists-forward-fund-of-alums-baker--ross-profiled-by-the-capital-times Women Artists Forward Fund of alums Baker, Ross profiled by The Capital TimesThe Women Artists Forward Fund, founded by UW-Madison alumnae Brenda Baker and Bird Ross, was recently profiled by the Capital Times. Baker earned her master of fine art’s from the School of Education’s Art Department in 1990, while Ross earned the same degree in 1992. The report explains how Baker and Ross dreamed up the idea for an art prize to support Dane County’s professional female artists two years ago, a result of the profound gender disparities of the art world.Thu, 21 Nov 2019 11:26:00 Z<p>The Women Artists Forward Fund, founded by UW-Madison alumnae Brenda Baker and Bird Ross, was recently profiled by the Capital Times.&nbsp;</p> <p>Baker earned her master of fine art&rsquo;s from the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" title="Art Dept. website" target="_blank">Art Department</a> in 1990, while Ross earned the same degree in 1992.&nbsp;</p> <p>The report explains how Baker and Ross dreamed up the idea for an art prize to support Dane County&rsquo;s professional female artists two years ago, a result of the profound gender disparities of the art world. According to The Capital Times, only 30 percent of artists represented in commercial galleries in U.S. are women.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;We wanted to showcase people who were artists, who keep their practice as their predominant work,&rdquo; Ross told the newspaper. &ldquo;We wanted people to know how those people are.&rdquo;</p> <p>After researching grant programs and working with others in the community, the pair launched the Women Artists Forward Fund (WAFF) in 2017 with the Madison Community Foundation and the Overture Center for the Arts signed on as partners. Baker and Ross&rsquo;s project is now the third largest grant for women artists in the country. &nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The web of connections we have now has been really gratifying,&rdquo; comments Baker. &ldquo;We have such a generous community, and we&rsquo;re so grateful for that.&rdquo;</p> <p>They put out their first call for artists in summer 2019, and received 70 applications. Last Friday, an anonymous jury chose the first two recipients, Jennifer Angus and Dakota Mace, a Din&eacute; (Navajo) artist, both with ties to the School of Education.</p> <p>Angus, who constructs intricate installations using real, dead insects, is the Audrey Rothermel Bascom Professor in Human Ecology. She is also an affiliate with the School of Education&rsquo;s Art Department.</p> <p>In applying, Angus was motivated by showing support for her collegaues and students. &ldquo;Getting this award, it&rsquo;s my turn to pay it forward,&rdquo; Angus said. &ldquo;I should be mentoring and supporting younger artists.&rdquo;</p> <p>Mace works in photography and indigenous textiles, and received her second master of fine arts (MFA) degree from UW-Madison in May 2018. Her first MFA was in photography, while the second was in textile design. She plans on use some of the grant funds for cochineal and indigo dyes, which will allow her to make fabric for weaving workshops. Mace reports to the Capital Times that she is excited to share her culture with a broader audience.&nbsp;</p> <p>In addition to the two winners, five women were named finalists: Hannah Bennet, Angelica Contreras, Martha Glowacki, Emily Leach, and Helen Lee.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Read The Capital Times article <a href="https://madison.com/ct/entertainment/arts_and_theatre/visual/dakota-mace-jennifer-angus-named-as-first-two-k-winners/article_1dec24f3-ef9a-5396-90e9-34d5945f782b.html" title="Capital Times article" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:adcbc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/11/20/finalists-for-wcer-director-post-visiting-campus-dec--5-16-for-open-forums Finalists for WCER director post visiting campus Dec. 5-16 for open forumsThree finalists to become the next director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER) are visiting campus from Dec. 5 to 16 to participate in public forums and meet with faculty, staff, and School of Education leadership. The finalists were selected by a 13-member search-and-screen committee co-chaired by WIDA Executive Director Tim Boals and Percival Matthews, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Psychology and a WCER researcher. The WCER director reports to the dean of the School of Education, Diana Hess.Wed, 20 Nov 2019 18:23:52 ZThree finalists to become the next director of the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" target="_blank" title="Visit the WCER website">Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER)</a>&nbsp;are visiting campus from Dec. 5 to 16 to participate in public forums and meet with faculty, staff, and School of Education leadership.<br /> <br /> The finalists were selected by a 13-member search-and-screen committee co-chaired by WIDA Executive Director Tim Boals and Percival Matthews, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Psychology and a WCER researcher.<br /> <br /> WCER is housed in the School of Education and is one of the oldest, largest, and most influential university-based education research centers in the United States.&nbsp;The WCER director reports to the dean of the School of Education, Diana Hess.<br /> <br /> All public presentations will be held in 5120&nbsp;<a href="https://map.wisc.edu/s/d7wci4mn" target="_blank" title="View map location of Grainger Hall">Grainger Hall</a>, from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.<br /> <br /> <p><strong>The dates of the open forums are:</strong></p> <p>&bull; Thursday, Dec. 5</p> <p> &bull; Thursday, Dec. 12</p> <p>&bull; Monday, Dec. 16</p> <p>The name of each candidate and that person's curriculum vitae&nbsp;will be made available&nbsp;via&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/soe/wcer-director-search" title="Visit the WCER director search web page" target="_blank">this WCER director search web page</a>&nbsp;48 hours before the finalist is scheduled for an open forum.</p> <p>A link to a recorded video of each candidate's presentation will also be available on the&nbsp;<a href="https://education.wisc.edu/soe/wcer-director-search" title="Visit the WCER director search web page" target="_blank">WCER director search web page</a>&nbsp;for people who are not able to attend. However, the question-and-answer&nbsp;portion of the presentations will not be captured. Videos will be removed 24 hours after they post.<br /> <br /> ​In order to help welcome these finalists, people are highly encouraged to attend the presentations in person.<br /> <br /> The firm Isaacson, Miller is assisting with the search for the next director. Hess will make the final selection.</p> <h3>We want to hear from you</h3> <p>You may submit your feedback on the finalists via&nbsp;<a href="https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_82s7Maaza1Ji1I9" title="Provide feedback here" target="_blank">this link</a>.<br /> <br /> <strong>Feedback must be received by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 17.</strong></p> <p><em>For questions or comments, contact Carole Kolb, administrative search coordinator, at&nbsp;<a href="mailto:carole.kolb@wisc.edu" title="Email Carole Kolb">carole.kolb@wisc.edu</a>&nbsp;or 608-890-1661</em></p>